Spotlight

COMMENTARY: Seniors invested in King County; now it’s their turn

May 22nd, 2019 | By
COMMENTARY: Seniors invested in King County; now it’s their turn

King County Executive Dow Constantine points out that the county is headed toward a quarter of its residents being at least 65 years old in 20 years–an important reason, he says, why the voter-approved Veterans, Seniors and Human Services Levy supports senior centers, housing development and repairs, and other services for older adults.



Fertile ground for gardeners and empty stomachs

May 9th, 2019 | By
Fertile ground for gardeners and empty stomachs

Another spring has sprung, which means a community at the southern end of Federal Way is entering its ninth year of giving its age 55-plus residents a place to grow vegetables and flowers to their collective hearts’ desire. Over the years, Kloshe Illahee’s community garden has grown in popularity and production. Last year, it was teeming with tomato, zucchini, yellow squash, lettuce and basil plants. One tomato plant spawned more than 100 tomatoes by itself. Some of the excess is donated to local food banks.



For green thumbs, dahlias come in all shapes, sizes and colors

Apr 23rd, 2019 | By
For green thumbs, dahlias come in all shapes, sizes and colors

With hundreds of varieties to choose from in a fabulous array of colors, shapes and flower sizes, dahlias are a must for your 2019 garden.
Not only are dahlias beautiful, but they’re also easy to grow. In the Pacific Northwest, the time to plant is after winter’s last frost, typically between Aprll 15 and June 1, according to Puget Sound Dahlia Association. Just plant the tuberous roots in a sunny, well-drained location, once the soil has warmed to about 60 degrees – or around the same time as you would plant tomatoes. It takes a week or two for the first shoots to emerge, but the plants grow quickly and will be blooming by mid-summer.



Never too old to be strong and fit

Mar 27th, 2019 | By
Never too old to be strong and fit

Chris Lunn is 81 years old, but to watch him in action, you would never know it. Years ago, after his back went out, he joined the YMCA for a strength and stability class that taught slow and methodical movements. When the leader of the class moved on and the class was in danger of being canceled for good, Lunn took over. “I told the Y, ‘I can teach that class,'” he said. The rest, as they say, is history.