Spotlight

Like father, like son

Jul 5th, 2018 | By
Like father, like son

Charles (Chuck) Milliman, 85, didn’t take up pole vaulting until he was 69. The following year, double-bypass heart surgery put his progress on hold. But by age 73, Chuck was back on track, literally, as he commenced a “late blooming” pole vaulting career that culminated in his winning a gold medal last year at the National Senior Games. On that same day in Birmingham, Ala., his son, Philip, earned a gold medal for his pole vaulting in the 65-69 age bracket. The rather rare feat will earn the Millmans some national-level recognition on July 20 as they compete in the 2018 Washington State Senior Games in Olympia.



‘What little boy doesn’t want to be a train engineer?’

Jun 25th, 2018 | By
‘What little boy doesn’t want to be a train engineer?’

John Helm never thought he’d have lasted this long, in the same job, the same city. But given the chance to fulfill his childhood dream, he said retirement surely could wait. Helm reached his amazing milestone March 7, which was 50 years to the day since he first became a bus driver for the Seattle Transit System, a predecessor to Metro and King County Metro. Over modest pizza and cake, surrounded by longtime friends, colleagues and family, John took it all in, a little shy at the attention.



New Medicare cards protect personal info

Jun 6th, 2018 | By
New Medicare cards protect personal info

Between April 2018 and April 2019, Medicare will mail new Medicare cards to help protect you and your clients from identity theft. Fraudsters are always looking for ways to get your Social Security number. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is removing Social Security numbers from all Medicare cards to make them safer. New cards will have a new Medicare number that’s unique to its owner and will help protect their identity and keep their personal information more secure.



The neighbors are watching

May 24th, 2018 | By
The neighbors are watching

Have you seen increasing graffiti in your neighborhood? Perhaps you’ve heard of an uptick in car thefts on your block, or maybe a child’s bicycle was stolen off a porch. Incidents like this can cause anxiety and frustration among a community’s residents, and may lead you to consider forming a Neighborhood Watch program. The U.S. Department of Justice defines a Neighborhood Watch as “a group of people living in the same area who want to make their neighborhood safer by working together and in conjunction with local law enforcement to reduce crime and improve their quality of life.”