Walkabouts

The pioneering life and times of Rebecca Carr

May 1st, 2013 | By

Of all the Carr family, Rebecca, Job Carr’s first wife, may be the most interesting. She was very secretive about her personal life but was known around the world. She refused to tell her age, but census records say she was born April 18, 1822 in St. Clairsville, Ohio. By most accounts, she was well-educated.
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Native Americans were forced into off-reservation schools

Mar 28th, 2013 | By

In the late 1870s, the U.S. government changed its policy regarding Native Americans from one of separation to one that focused on assimilation into mainstream American society. The Secretary of the Interior authorized two federal, off-reservation boarding schools. The Carlisle Indian School opened in Pennsylvania in 1879, and the Forest Grove Indian Industrial and Training
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Four months in a police chief’s life

Feb 27th, 2013 | By

On Oct. 18, 1890, Republican George B. Kandle was elected Tacoma’s mayor. In those days, the city operated under a commissioner system, and many jobs were by political appointment. Kandle appointed William F. Zwickey chief of police and Zwickey fired 15 non-Republican policemen. When Zwickey took office, he said he would investigate every complaint against
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Jacob Halstead: Oregon trail pioneer and true founding father

Jan 29th, 2013 | By
Jacob Halstead: Oregon trail pioneer and true founding father

Some of old Tacoma as it looked during the Washington territory days. Tacoma Public Library/courtesy photo   Jacob Halstead: a True Founding Father Oregon Trail Pioneer Jacob Halstead, his second wife Jane (his first wife died) and their children Jeannette, Etta, George, and Frank moved to New Tacoma in 1873 when the city consisted of
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